“Ac-Cent-Tchu-Ate the Positive” in National Recording Registry

Johnny Mercer at Capitol Records

Johnny Mercer at Capitol Records

It was announced today that Johnny Mercer’s “Ac-Cent-Tchu-Ate the Positive” was selected for induction into the Library of Congress National Recording Registry.  Each year 25 sound recordings are added to the registry that have been recognized for their cultural, artistic and/or historical significance to American society and the nation’s audio legacy.

“Ac-Cent-Tchu-Ate the Positive” was written by Johnny Mercer and Harold Arlen in 1944 for the film Here Comes the Waves, and Mercer recorded this song for Capitol Records (of which he was a co-founder).  Within the Johnny Mercer Collection housed in the Special Collections and Archives there are numerous recordings, sheet music, documents, and awards pertaining to this song.

Questions about the Johnny Mercer Collection should be directed to Kevin Fleming, archivist, Popular Music and Culture Collection, at 404-413-2880 or archives@gsu.edu.

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Posted in For Faculty, For Graduate Students, For Students, General News, Music, Primary Resources, Resources, Special Collections & Archives | 1 Comment

Two New Primary-Source Databases: Illustrated London News Historical Archive, 1842-2003 and Slavery & Anti-Slavery: A Transnational Archive

The GSU Library now subscribes to two new primary-source databases, Illustrated London News Historical Archive, 1842-2003 and Slavery & Anti-Slavery: A Transnational Archive, available through our Databases A-Z list under “I” and “S,” respectively.

masthead, Illustrated London News

The Illustrated London News is a historical London newspaper, first appearing in May 1842 and publishing until its closure in 2003. The world’s first fully illustrated weekly newspaper, The Illustrated London News appeared weekly from 1842-1971, then monthly from 1971-1989, bi-monthly from 1994, and twice a year from 1994-2003. A conservative newspaper known for its reliance on illustrations and, after 1890, photographs, the Illustrated London News published well-known illustrators and authors (see here for examples). Our subscription to this database complements our existing subscription to the Times Digital Archive, which includes coverage of the Times of London from 1785-1985. For other British newspaper holdings, see the “International Newspapers” tab in the Historical Newspaper Holdings research guide.

logo, Slavery & Anti-Slavery

Slavery & Anti-Slavery: A Transnational Archive is a collection of primary sources covering the history of slavery from the early colonial period through the late nineteenth century. Organized thematically, this database has four parts:

  • Part I: Debates over Slavery and Abolition
  • Part II: Slave Trade in the Atlantic World (with particular focus on the United Kingdom, France, and the United States)
  • Part III: Institution of Slavery
  • Part IV: Age of Emancipation

Materials included are books, pamphlets, newspapers, periodicals, legal documents, speeches, court records, monographs, manuscripts and historical maps. A taste of collections included (among others):

  • American Colonization Society: A Register of Its Records in the Library of Congress
  • Indexes to Deposit Ledgers in Branches of the Freedman’s Savings and Trust Company, 1865-1874
  • Office of the Adjutant General, Office of the Freedman’s Bureau, 1872-1878
  • Presbyterian Church in the U. S. A. Board of Missions for Freedmen Annual Reports, 1866-1923
  • Records of the Senate Select Committee That Investigated John Brown’s Raid at Harper’s Ferry, Virginia
  • Records of the Spanish Governors of Puerto Rico, Registro Central de Esclavos, 1872 (Slave Schedules)

In addition to many primary sources, in its “Research Tools” section, Slavery & Anti-Slavery also includes suggestions for using its resources in teaching, a chronology of slavery with links to relevant primary sources in the database, several historiographical essays, and links to other relevant websites and resources.

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Posted in Databases, For Faculty, For Graduate Students, For Students, New Resources, Primary Resources, Resources | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Speaker: Civil Rights, Labor, and the Politics of Economic Development in Charlotte, North Carolina

Attendees to CIO Leadership Training, 1954, Lake Junaluska, North Carolina. [ L1984-70_265]

Attendees to CIO Leadership Training, 1954, Lake Junaluska, North Carolina. [ L1984-70_265]

Join us in Georgia State University’s Department of History for Julia Gunn’s upcoming talk based on research for her in-progress dissertation, “‘A Good Place to Make Money’: Civil Rights, Labor, and the Politics of Economic Development in Charlotte, North Carolina.” Gunn is an awardee of the 2014 Reed Fink Award in Southern Labor History which is sponsored by the Southern Labor Archives. Gunn is a PhD student at the University of Pennsylvania with research interests in the Sunbelt; Civil Rights and Black Power; labor and working class history; and the history of capitalism. She has published and presented extensively on these topics.

Gunn’s research “sits at the intersection of two important bodies of scholarship. In recent years, civil rights scholarship has focused increased attention on the movement’s emphasis on economic justice. At the same time, labor and business historians have become interested in the role of business interest groups in undermining organized labor. My dissertation attempts to bridge these two often-divergent bodies of scholarship by looking at public employee unionism, the politics of racial moderation, and the development of pro-business governance in the urban South. Through the lens of public employee unions and the campaigns waged against them, this project traces the evolution of racially moderate, anti-union politics that have fundamentally reshaped the American political landscape.”

 Date: Friday, March 27, 2015

Location: 25 Park Place, Room 2150 (Department of History)

Time: 2:00 PM

Professors Merl E. Reed and Gary Fink helped establish and develop the Southern Labor Archives at Georgia State University Library. The Reed Fink Award in Southern Labor History honors both men and their many contributions to education, labor studies, and the Southern Labor Archives. The deadline for the 2015 Reed Fink Award is May 15, 2015.

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Posted in African American Studies, Economics, For Faculty, For Graduate Students, For Students, General News, History, Primary Resources, Special Collections & Archives | Leave a comment

New Virtual Exhibits

Students protesting the election of Herman Talmadge from the “Passing the Torch of Activism” exhibit.

Students protesting the election of Herman Talmadge from the “Passing the Torch of Activism” exhibit.

Virtual exhibits created by the Special Collection and Archives are now available online.

The current exhibit topics include the history of radio broadcasting in Georgia, history of Atlanta women’s organizations, and grass roots activism.  Additional exhibits will be added periodically in the future.

All of these exhibits contain materials that are housed in the Special Collections and Archives, and can serve as a launching point for a research project.  The exhibit topics are merely a small fraction of the subject areas and collections held within the department.  To find out more about the collections, visit the Special Collections and Archives webpage or in-person on the 8th Floor of Library South.

Questions about the exhibits or collections should be directed to the Special Collections and Archives at 404-413-2880 or archives@gsu.edu.

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Seminar: Major Pediatric Diabetes Prevention Trial

Anita_Nucci_PortraitAnita Nucci, PhD, MPH, RD, LD of the School of Nursing and Health Professions Nutrition Department will present “Nutritional Prevention of Type I Diabetes: A Research Trial.”

Tuesday, March 24, 2015
11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.
Student Center, Suite 220

Dr. Nucci is the Nutrition Coordinator for the North American Coordinating Center of the worldwide Trial to Reduce Insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus in the Genetically at Risk (TRIGR).

She will give a status update of the multinational TRIGR trial. The trial is underway on three continents with 2,159 eligible infants randomized to test or control formulas when mothers decide to wean from exclusive breastfeeding. The participants will be monitored until February 2017 for the appearance of diabetes-predictive autoantibodies and clinical type 1 diabetes. This is the largest ever primary type 1 diabetes prevention trial to date.

Outcomes from the trial are already being published:

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Posted in Faculty Publications and Research, For Faculty, For Graduate Students, For Students, General News, Nutrition, Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Georgia State at the Atlanta Science Festival

Photo courtesy of  somethingstartedcrazy on  Flickr. (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

Photo courtesy of somethingstartedcrazy on Flickr. (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

Now in its second year, the Atlanta Science Festival offers the opportunity for scientists and students to share their research and promote interest in science to the public and each other. As a Gold Sponsor, Georgia State University hosts many events, starting with Saturday’s Discovery Day. Want to see what science at GSU looks like, see how art is intersecting with science, or just learn something new? Bring family and friends to these free Georgia State events:

Discovery Day (March 21, 9:30am – 2:30pm)
The Petit Science Center open house offers events of interest to the whole family, from interactive stations showcasing liquid nitrogen ice cream and zombie brains to an hourly Career Blitz for prospective and current GSU science students. Arrive early for transportation to Geoscience at Stone Mountain.

GSU Astronomy at Hard Labor Creek Observatory (March 21, 7:30pm – 9:30pm)
Want to see much more than the Big Dipper in the night sky? Visit this open house at Hard Labor Creek to see the sky through the three telescopes that Georgia State’s astronomers use for research.

Eureka Screen Series (March 23, 25, 26, 7:00pm)
Watch science documentaries from a variety of filmmakers at Cinefest, including discussions from Georgia State and Georgia Tech science faculty. Topics include The Human Condition (March 23), Fantastic Fauna (March 25, 7:30pm), and Sustainability (March 26).

The Electronic Life of Plants (March 24, 7:00pm – 9:00pm)
Visit the Fusion Gallery at Whitespace to see Duncan Laurie of Dragonline Studio transform the vibrations of rocks and plants into music and visual art.

Plastic Gyre Symposium (March 25-26, 10:00am)
The accumulation of plastic waste is an ever-growing problem for our planet and everything that lives on it. Explore the issues of plastic pollution through art, film, and discussions throughout this this two-day symposium created by GSU art professor Pam Longobardi. Thursday’s events are hosted in the Student Center, while Friday’s are at the David J. Sencer CDC Museum.

Volunteer slots are still available for many of these events. In addition, don’t forget over 100 other events of the Science Festival, including the grand finale of the Exploration Expo at Centennial Olympic Park (March 28, 11:00am-4:00pm).

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Posted in Art & Design, Biology, Chemistry, For Faculty, For Graduate Students, For Students, General News, Geosciences, Mathematics & Statistics, Neuroscience, Nursing, Physics & Astronomy, Psychology, Uncategorized | Tagged | Leave a comment

Congrats to the Men’s Basketball Team & Coach Hunter!

Image by Rob Buenaventura CC-BY-NC

Image by Rob Buenaventura
CC-BY-NC

Georgia State’s men’s basketball team won their opening game in the NCAA tournament  yesterday, upsetting number 3-seed Baylor, in a nail-biting, down-to-the-buzzer finish. (Read a full recap here.) All of us here at the Library want to heartily congratulate the entire team and Coach Hunter on an amazing win!

Don’t forget to cheer on the Panthers in their next game against Xavier on March 21! Tip-off is at 6:10pm; the game will air on TNT.

If you want to see more come-from-behind inspirational sports stories, look no further than the Library’s video collection! Here are some of our top picks.

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New Faculty Publication on Aztec Gods and God-Bodies

Congratulations to Dr. Molly Bassett on the publication of her new book The Fate of Earthly Things: Aztec Gods and God-Bodies (University of Texas Press).

From the publisher:

In The Fate of Earthly Things, Molly Bassett draws on ethnographic fieldwork, linguistic analyses, visual culture, and ritual studies to explore what ritual practices such as human sacrifice and the manufacture of deity embodiments (including humans who became gods), material effigies, and sacred bundles meant to the Aztecs. She analyzes the Aztec belief that wearing the flayed skin of a sacrificial victim during a sacred rite could transform a priest into an embodiment of a god or goddess, as well as how figurines and sacred bundles could become localized embodiments of gods. Without arguing for unbroken continuity between the Aztecs and modern speakers of Nahuatl, Bassett also describes contemporary rituals in which indigenous Mexicans who preserve costumbres (traditions) incorporate totiotzin (gods) made from paper into their daily lives. This research allows us to understand a religious imagination that found life in death and believed that deity embodiments became animate through the ritual binding of blood, skin, and bone.

Dr. Bassett is Assistant Professor in the Department of Religious Studies. Her research aims at understanding the intersection of religion and the natural world in Aztec and Nahua cultures. Recent publications include:

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New Faculty Publication: Building the Ghanaian Nation-State: Kwame Nkrumah’s Symbolic Nationalism

cover, Harcourt Fuller, Building the Ghanaian Nation-StateProf. Harcourt Fuller of the History Department has recently published his new book, Building the Ghanaian Nation-State: Kwame Nkrumah’s Symbolic Nationalism (2014).

As the first country in Sub-Saharan Africa to gain independence from a European imperial power, Ghana has always occupied a position of primacy in the African political and historical imagination. This is due in no small part to the indelible impression left by its first president, the charismatic and self-promoting Kwame Nkrumah, who by his death had become one of the most iconic figures of the postcolonial era. Nkrumah’s legacy has long been the subject of debate, with some depicting him as a pioneering nationalist and others as a dictatorial megalomaniac, and the political, social, and global-historical dimensions of his presidency have been thoroughly studied. At the same time, the symbolic, semiotic, iconographical, and ephemeral strategies he used to consolidate power and construct a coherent Ghanaian nation-state have been largely neglected by scholars. This innovative study of Nkrumah and Ghana offers a fascinating look at his propagandistic use of political iconography through ‘symbols of nationhood’ such as currency, postage stamps, museums, monuments, Adinkra symbols, the national anthem, emblems, and both national and party flags. As author Harcourt Fuller demonstrates here, the premiership of the self-proclaimed Founder of the State of Ghana was mainly characterized by a cult of personality wherein Nkrumah branded the national flock with his image by personalizing public symbols of nationhood. (from publisher’s information)

Prof. Fuller has an article forthcoming in African Studies Quarterly as well; his other publications include:

image, Akwantu: The JourneyAs a descendant and scholar of the Jamaican Maroons, Dr. Fuller’s is currently working on several books, journal articles on Maroon history, culture and identity. In addition to his research and teaching, Prof. Fuller also has a strong interest in documentary film production; he is the Educational Outreach Director for the award-winning documentary-film on the Jamaican Maroons, Akwantu: the Journey (available for checkout or viewing in the GSU Library, here), and writer/producer for the forthcoming documentary-film Queen Nanny: Legendary Maroon Chieftainess. He is also working on a new book about Queen Nanny of the Maroons, as well as a monograph entitled, Maroons in the Family: History, Memory and Migration in the Life of a Jamaican Maroon Clan.

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Posted in African American Studies, Books, Faculty Publications and Research, For Faculty, For Graduate Students, For Students, History, Political Science, Videos | Leave a comment

Why Professors are creating and using free and open textbooks

USHistoryUNGCollege textbook prices are increasing faster than tuition and inflation. The College Board estimates that students need $1200 per year for textbooks. Based on that number, students in the University System of Georgia (USG) could spend $360,000,000 this year on textbooks. With the high price of textbooks, students often need to wait until their student loan check arrives before buying the textbook, and some students forgo the textbook altogether due to costs.

Some professors have said enough of this already. Today’s technology allows us to create and distribute effective, quality content at practically no cost. So, let’s offer textbooks for free. Let’s create flexible content that gives students multiple formats to choose from. We may be able to offer students the option to print (or purchase a print copy for less than their own cost of printing) or access the content on their tablet, phone, or computer. Maybe students will even save the content forever so that their learning doesn’t stop when the course is over. We could even assign a license that provides the right to adapt and redistribute the work so that both students and teachers have the flexibility they need to teach and learn.

Content that allows for such flexible uses are known as Open Educational Resources (OER). A growing body of empirical research has shown improvements in retention, completion, GPAs and other factors with the use of OERs. Learn more about finding and using open resources with this Affordable Learning Georgia (ALG) tutorial. For additional assistance, contact Denise Dimsdale (mdimsdale@gsu.edu), ALG Library Coordinator or George Pullman(gpullman@gsu.edu), ALG Campus Champion.

Check out these OER textbooks in use in some USG courses:

American Governmentmedium_Sociology_700x906biology_uga

 

 

 

 

 

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Posted in Faculty Publications and Research, For Faculty, Instruction, Services | Tagged , , , , | 2 Comments