New Resource: Washington Evening Star Historical Archive, 1852-1981

image, Evening Star mastheadGSU affiliates now have digital access to the Washington Evening Star Historical Archive, 1852-1981. Founded on December 16, 1852 and closing on August 7, 1981, the Evening Star covered over 130 years of American history from within Washington, DC.

From publisher’s information:

Until its demise in 1981, The Evening Star was universally regarded as the “paper of record” for the nation’s capital. Published under such titles as Washington Star-News and The Washington Star, this long-running daily afternoon paper was one of the highest profile publications in the nation. Founded in 1852, by the 1930s its coverage of national politics—including the daily activities of every branch of government–made it the nation’s number one paper in advertising revenue.

From its earliest years, the Star was a contrarian powerhouse, not afraid to buck Washington’s prevailing political winds. Prior to the Civil War, as abolitionists decried slavery in their own publications, the Star presented both sides of the debate. During the War itself, the Star’s excellent reporting increased its popularity; even today Civil War historians frequently cite Star articles at length. By the mid-20th century—a period marked by McCarthyism, landmark Civil Rights legislation and the beginning of the space race—the Star reached its zenith in local circulation and national influence. Between 1944 and 1981, Star writers, reporters and cartoonists accumulated 10 Pulitzer Prizes.

We have several other digital editions of major US newspapers available to GSU affiliates including:

For information about other historical newspapers available at the Georgia State University Library, check out our Historical Newspaper Holdings research guide.

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Posted in Communication, Databases, For Faculty, For Graduate Students, For Students, History, Journalism, New Resources, Political Science, Resources | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Visit the University Library for Free Exam Week Events!

exam-week-badge

A little break goes a long way during stressful study sessions. That’s why we’re offering fun distractions throughout the week, right here in the Library.

The University Library will be hosting the following events during finals week:

 

Monday 4/27
Student Innovation Fellowship Showcase & Information Session
12:00 – 1:00 p.m., CURVE
Hear from students and faculty who are currently engaged in the program about the innovative research projects and creative work completed this year.

Tuesday 4/28
The Rec Center Presents #GSUFIT
3:30 – 3:50 p.m., Library North Lobby
Boost your brainpower with a few minutes of cardio, led by a fitness instructor from the University Recreation Center.

Wednesday 4/29
Snack Break
3:30 p.m. – until supplies run out, Library North Lobby
Fuel your study session with a stop at our make-your-own-trail-mix bar.

Thursday 4/30
Origami
1:00 – 4:00 p.m., Library North Lobby
Wind down from a busy semester with this relaxing paper craft.

All events are open to current students with an active Campus ID.

*Thanks to Kaydee Wilson for this post.

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Tracing a History of Atlanta’s Public Transit

marta_sif_projectWith MARTA expanding into Clayton County and the agency now resting on a more sound financial footing thanks to efforts by Keith Parker, MARTA appears to be on an upswing. As the concept of transit oriented development gains momentum, more areas across metro Atlanta appear open to the benefits of transit, leading some to conclude that MARTA may expand further out across the region. However, since MARTA’s 1960s inception it was planned to be a far-reaching, regional transit system. In each decade since MARTA’s beginnings, the agency proposed routes that would have made MARTA a truly expansive system. A number of these proposed MARTA routes can now be visualized in Tracing a History of Atlanta’s Public Transit, a digital project by a team of Student Innovation Fellowship (SIF) students working in the University Library’s CURVE.

This SIF team gathered MARTA proposals from the library’s Planning Atlanta collection, located information from the Georgia Power streetcar system era, and collected material about the Atlanta Streetcar and the Atlanta Beltline. By tracing each proposed route, this team turned this information into geospatial data and created Tracing a History of Atlanta’s Public Transit, which clearly shows MARTA’s far-reaching intentions. As the state and the region begin to look more favorably on transit investment, this project aims to contribute to larger discussions taking place around the topic of public transit in Atlanta.

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Posted in Computer Information Systems, Computer Science, Digital Collections, For Faculty, For Graduate Students, For Students, General News, Geosciences, Government Information, History, Journalism, Public Health, Public Management & Policy, Social Work, Sociology | 1 Comment

New! More Subject Areas Added to Oxford Bibliographies Online

Oxford Bibliographies OnlineGood news! We’ve recently added four new subject areas to our Oxford Bibliographies Online (OBO) holdings. The new areas are:

  • Cinema and Media Studies
  • Communication
  • Latin American Studies
  • Sociology

Each subject area within OBO presents in-depth background information (written by top experts) on major topics within the field, making OBO a great place to start your research. These new areas are in addition to the ones we got back in 2012, bringing our total number of areas in OBO up to 12!

To access OBO, click on the Discover tab on the Library homepage, then click on the letter “O” on the Databases by Name A-Z list and scroll down.

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Zombies Attack User Services & Technology Support!

The Georgia State University Library has experienced a zombie attack that has wiped out almost the entire University Library staff. Over the course of this National Library Week, the few survivors gave their accounts of the disasters befalling the University Library due to the absence of these vital library workers.

Zombies-NLW-2015

Cynthia’s Account:

The doors open to Library North, the usual early comers enter. A few students go to the first floor desk, but there are no workers on desk. At the same time, a group of students go to the second floor desk – and you guessed it – no workers on desk.

No reserve books or DVDs to check out, no GIL express or Interlibrary Loan books to distribute, no fines payments are accepted, no holds are removed, students start to panic.

Students start to protest.

Meanwhile, the students wanting to check out equipment on the second floor see no workers. No telephone chargers, no laptops, no calculators, no V-room access – no check outs at all.

Now, students converge to the Library Administration Offices shouting – “No Check Outs, No Peace!” …

Rumors circulate that the GSU library personnel User Services and Technology Support staff were consumed by zombies!

Suddenly my eyes open and I realize it was all just a  bad dream – oh, what a nightmare!*

*This account and those previously posted this week are fictional. You can rest assured that the Georgia State University Library employees have not been eaten by zombies and are still hard at work providing the critical library services necessary for you to succeed at Georgia State University.  Thanks for celebrating National Library Week with us, a week-long celebration in recognition for the contributions of our nation’s libraries and library workers – and particularly for celebrating it zombie style. ;-)

And many thanks to our Personnel Development Committee members who wrote these creative zombie posts: Cynthia Hollaway-Owens, Pam Lucas, Mandy Swygart-Hobaugh, Jackie Werner, and Susan Wynne.

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Zombies Attack Technical Services!

The Georgia State University Library has experienced a zombie attack that has wiped out almost the entire University Library staff. Over the course of this National Library Week, the few survivors will give their accounts of the disasters befalling the University Library due to the absence of these vital library workers.

Zombies-NLW-2015

Susan’s Account:

A frazzled student approaches the Research Support Desk. “Er, can you help me? My paper is due in two hours, and my professor says I have to have a peer-reviewed scholarly article, and I just located the last perfect article I need, but the link doesn’t work.” Before the reference librarian on duty can draw breath to respond with a cheerful, “Sure, let’s take a look,” the phone rings. Then the tweets and emails begin to trickle in; slowly at first, but then with a rising sense of panic. We can’t get the articles we need! Is the Internet broken, someone asks? No—other websites are working. Is GALILEO down? No one else in Georgia has reported problems.

Meanwhile, a film studies professor can’t find the DVD she is scheduled to show to a community symposium in ten minutes! She ordered it RUSH last week, but it’s not in the GIL catalog so we don’t even know where to look! Students report locating titles in the GIL catalog for their research topics, but all the records seem to have a hideous, dreadful red error message where the call numbers should be. And the stacks student workers are waiting for new materials to shelve but there aren’t any. Eventually, a ghostly-looking book cart appears, but the spine labels are either nonexistent or look funny and there are no records in the GIL catalog for any of these titles.

A flurry of helpdesk tickets, emails, and phone calls to Technical Services ensues, with no response. Come to think of it, has anybody seen them today? After several hours of calming confused students and professors, finally a harried User Services employee has a moment to slip up to the 6th floor. Hearing odd noises, he gingerly opens the Technical Services office door. “Hello? Is anyone there?”

One by one, the Technical Services department staff comes to meet their colleague, looking tired but triumphant. “Some deceased authors escaped from the authority files. This morning we caught them suppressing GIL records and breaking e-journal links. Finally we were able to break free long enough to add death dates to their authority records, and that seemed to satisfy them. We’re just running a few more reports to make sure we’ve fixed all the problems.”

Next day:

All is normal in Technical Services, as we work hard to provide access to all the resources our students, faculty, and staff need and wrangling “zombie” data in the catalog and e-resource management systems!*


*This account and those to follow are fictional. You can rest assured that the Georgia State University Library employees have not been eaten by zombies and are still hard at work providing the critical library services necessary for you to succeed at Georgia State University – happy National Library Week! :-)

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Zombies Attack Collection Development and Interlibrary Loan!

The Georgia State University Library has experienced a zombie attack that has wiped out almost the entire University Library staff. Over the course of this National Library Week, the few survivors will give their accounts of the disasters befalling the University Library due to the absence of these vital library workers.

Zombies-NLW-2015

Mandy’s Account:

It appears that the Collection Development and Interlibrary Loan departments have fallen victim to the zombie attack as well, and the library has come to a complete standstill without these important behind-the-scenes workers. The new books and journals and DVDs that have arrived are just sitting in their FedEx boxes forlornly because the Collection Development staff is not here to get them ready to catalog. We can’t even access the online journals because our Head of Collection Development isn’t here to pay the bills for those subscriptions – that’s right, those online journals just don’t appear out of thin air – somebody has to coordinate our subscribing to and paying for them! And our book stacks are in shambles! The zombies had aimlessly pulled books and journals and DVDs and VHS tapes off the shelves and taken bites before throwing them on the floor in disgust – and now our Stacks Maintenance crew isn’t here to reshelve those just nibbled on and thus salvageable, nor to ask that we order new ones to replace those gnawed beyond use. Not that we could order new stuff anyway: our Collection Development ordering staff are nowhere to be found. And we could analyze our circulation statistics to see if those devoured things are even worth replacing, but the Collection Development staff members who run those analyses have succumbed to the zombies as well…

You might be thinking, “Well, for those books eaten beyond readability we could request that other libraries send those to us, right?” But, no! Our entire Interlibrary Loan workers who process those requests are gone – GONE! You know what else that means? That means that we can’t get those journal articles you want from other libraries delivered electronically so fast and efficiently either – there’s no one to submit that request for you – it doesn’t happen by magic, you know! And just think of those poor students and professors at other libraries that depend on our Interlibrary Loan staff to send them journal articles and books so they can do their research – they are lost without our Interlibrary Loan workers – LOST, I tell you!  And so are we, friends.  So are we…

Oh, the horror, the horror!*


*This account and those to follow are fictional. You can rest assured that the Georgia State University Library employees have not been eaten by zombies and are still hard at work providing the critical library services necessary for you to succeed at Georgia State University – happy National Library Week! :-)

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Zombies Attack Special Collections & Archives!

The Georgia State University Library has experienced a zombie attack that has wiped out almost the entire University Library staff. Over the course of this National Library Week, the few survivors will give their accounts of the disasters befalling the University Library due to the absence of these vital library workers.

Zombies-NLW-2015

Susan’s Account:

A group of students and budding social activists have gathered in the library. They look excited but a little bewildered, so I ask them if they need help.

“Our professor says we have some good books and articles for our project on feminism, but she said we need primary sources. But I don’t know what that means. What are primary sources? Where do we find them?”

After a brief explanation of primary sources, I tell them about Special Collections & Archives. “And you’re in luck. We have a lot of great material on women’s studies, especially the women’s movement in Georgia. There are really interesting things like oral history interviews, rare periodicals, personal papers or correspondence of many women involved in the movement, and even political buttons. Some of it is online, but you’ll really want to schedule a visit in-person. And the archivists and staff can give you expert guidance to the collections.” I offer to take them upstairs to consult the employee on duty in the reading room.

But when we get there, it’s almost deserted and the atmosphere is eerie. The only people in sight are a woman who’s there to record an oral history interview and a man wanting to donate a box of machinists’ union records he located in his grandfather’s basement. And then we know—the zombie attack has reached the 8th floor! I run into the Special Collections stacks to find many years of university records scattered on the floor, rare books gone, and unique AJC photographs trampled and torn! The records and untold stories of southern labor unions, Atlanta’s first radio station, many local social activists, the legendary songwriter Johnny Mercer, and so much more—disappeared or destroyed!

Our valiant Special Collections department works every day to collect and protect unique and rare resources, not from undead, brain-eating creatures but from the dangers of neglect, decay, and technical obsolescence. They don’t just preserve irreplaceable materials and knowledge, they arrange, describe, and digitize resources for use by researchers. But the materials aren’t the only treasure stores of knowledge in Special Collections— the human brains are too. Oh no, I didn’t mean to say BRAINS! The zombies are coming back!

P.S. Special Collections staff assures me that there are no known photographs of previous zombie attacks in Atlanta in the AJC Photo Archive.*


*This account and those to follow are fictional. You can rest assured that the Georgia State University Library employees have not been eaten by zombies and are still hard at work providing the critical library services necessary for you to succeed at Georgia State University – happy National Library Week! :-)

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Zombies Attack CURVE and Research & Engagement Librarians!

The Georgia State University Library has experienced a zombie attack that has wiped out almost the entire University Library staff. Over the course of this National Library Week, the few survivors will give their accounts of the disasters befalling the University Library due to the absence of these vital library workers.

Zombies-NLW-2015

Jackie’s Account:

The first sign of trouble is the giant human brain visible on CURVE’s interactWall when you walk into Library South. That wouldn’t be so strange, except the parts of the brain are labeled “tasty,” “delicious,” and “yum.” You swipe into CURVE, thinking of a way to help: Maybe you can display a warning on the interactWall? But without CURVE librarians and staff to help out, you don’t know how to use the interactWall. You could use a CURVE workstation to work out some statistics and calculate how many zombies are left—but none of the CURVE consultation team is there to help with the programs you could use. Even worse, you can see there are some zombies nearby and there’s no one to enforce the no eating (brains) in CURVE rule.

You think to yourself, “Zombie fighting counts as a research topic, right?” Slipping past the zombies, you rush over to the Research Support desk on Library North 1 while you go to the library website on your phone. You could use Live Assistance chat to ask for advice—but no, there’s no librarian on chat to answer your question. And once you get to the Research Support desk, there’s no one there either. There’s no Research and Engagement librarian to walk you through finding zombie attack articles, or to order credible books on fending off zombies, or to create a Research Guide collecting all the library’s zombie resources. And there’s no one to help you remember what the nagging thought is at the back of your mind…

Wait, wasn’t your class coming to the library today?

Holding your breath, you sneak over to Classroom 1 and peek in. Your classmates are in there, and there’s the database you’re supposed to be learning projected at the front of the room. But instead of a librarian demonstrating how to search for scholarly articles, there’s a zombie standing at the front of the classroom.

And no results are found for “AAAAAAAARGH.”*


*This account and those to follow are fictional. You can rest assured that the Georgia State University Library employees have not been eaten by zombies and are still hard at work providing the critical library services necessary for you to succeed at Georgia State University – happy National Library Week! :-)

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It’s National Library Week…but where are our Library Administration and Digital Library Services workers?

Pam arrives at the Georgia State University Library on the first day of National Library Week – a week of celebrations to demonstrate appreciation for the dedication and hard work of our library employees.  But something is amiss…

Pam’s Account:

The day started like any other. You know, the need for early morning coffee and endless traffic. As I pulled into the empty parking lot I had this eerie sensation that something wasn’t right. Shaking it off, I walked into the building and noticed that the lights were still off. “Our Facilities Coordinator must be running late this morning,” I thought. I made my way up to my office and tried to turn on the lights and my computer. No lights, but after a few minutes – “the blue screen of death” on my computer screen. I needed to put in a help desk ticket in a hurry. Firing up my iPad I realized that the internet was down too. I tried to call someone in Digital Library Services to see what was up with the internet and to let them know what was going on with my computer – no answer. The clock said 9:00am, so where was everybody?

I decided to do some paperwork while I waited for someone to come in. After a few minutes the phone rang – a student reporting that the bathroom on Library North 1 was flooding into the hallway. No one had come into my office, and I still had no computer access, so I went down to Library South 2 to report the issues to our Facilities Coordinator. There were still no lights on downstairs or in the Library South 2 suite, and no one was in sight. “Okay, now it’s getting creepy,” I thought. I went into the suite to see if anyone was there; there was not a soul in sight. I tried turning on the lights but had no luck. I needed to let someone know about the flooding so I headed back up to my desk to call campus facilities. I decided to stop first and see if anyone from Digital Library Services had come in. Walking around the department it was clear that all the cubicles were empty. No coats, no computers logged in, no cups of coffee, nothing. What was going on?

When I got back to my desk the phones were ringing off the hook, and still none of my Library Administration officemates were in – no Dean or Associate Deans, no Administrative Assistants, no Library Administrative Coordinator, no Assessment & User Experience Librarian. And calls were coming in from all over the library and campus: the entire building was dark except for the emergency lights; none of the computers or printers were working; someone was stuck in the elevator on the fifth floor; FedEx was trying to deliver 100 large boxes of computers; employee paychecks were bouncing and health benefits deductions were all a mess; our online user survey wasn’t working; our digital collections were all offline; and all the digital and print signs in the library were spattered with some strange red substance. No facilities assistance, no technical support, no one in the mailroom, no business or human resources support, no public relations and marketing support, no user experience and assessment support, no library Dean or Associate Deans to turn to for help…was I being punk’d?!

Under normal circumstances I would calmly weigh my options and find a workable solution. Although these kinds of things happen every day in the library, it takes a team of pros to make it all run smoothly – and none of them had come to work today! So under cover of self-preservation I grabbed my keys and decided to go outside to clear my head. The moment the double doors closed behind me on the 1st floor I froze in a panic when I saw them lumbering around the Plaza…ZOMBIES!

And it dawned on me: Zombies had eaten my coworkers in Library Administration and Digital Library Services – NO!!!!!

Zombies-NLW-2015 Stay tuned this National Library Week as the few survivors give their accounts of the disasters befalling the University Library due to the absence of these vital library workers.*


*This account and those to follow are fictional. You can rest assured that the Georgia State University Library employees have not been eaten by zombies and are still hard at work providing the critical library services necessary for you to succeed at Georgia State University – happy National Library Week! :-)

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